Kepler Communications Inc.

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Kepler’s high-power nanosatellites

Our Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites spin around the Earth at 575 km altitude, completing an orbit every 90 minutes. These space birds deliver total coverage to the planet. From pole-to-pole, each satellite can transport hundreds of GB every day for any customer, providing superior connectivity for the most demanding needs.

Economic

Power efficient

Low weight

High performance

Pole-to-pole

Featherweight satellites that punch way above their weight

Kepler’s custom-built software-defined radio (SDR) is an ultra-high-throughput communications payload that enables great flexibility in Kepler’s service offering.

It allows us to quickly setup hardware for launch and then constantly improve the satellite’s capabilities with software updates — something that would be impossible with hardware radio solutions. With this radio, Kepler can use the same hardware to support customers with many different data needs.

  • Dynamically adjust channel bandwidths and data rates
  • Use a wide variety of telecommunication protocols for different applications
  • Modify center frequency to ensure non-interference with other networks

First Ku-band Commercial Leo Satellites

First Ku-band Commercial LEO Satellites

Kepler launched and operates the first commercial Ku-band LEO satellite.

Ku-band (10.7 – 12.7 GHz for transmit and 14.0 – 14.5 GHz for receive) is substantially higher than traditional nanosatellite frequencies, which are often around 2 GHz for bi-directional communications. This offers increased available bandwidth to support larger data applications.

A sophisticated antenna array is necessary at these higher frequencies. An antenna array is made up of many smaller antenna elements that, when combined, create a high-gain and highly directed radiofrequency beam.

Constellation roll-out

Why a LEO constellation?

LEO vs. GEO

KEPLER develops next-generation satellite communication technologies and provides global satellite data backhaul services for wideband and Internet of Things applications with the long-term goal of building a network of satellites to provide in-space connectivity.

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